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CAE Executive Director Elected American Astronomical Society's Education Officer!
Mix One-Part Astronomy Education Research with One-Part General Education Astronomy Course and You Get a Very Potent Science Literacy Transformation Cocktail

If you want to watch his talk on the AAS website, click here.

If you want to download his talk, More >>

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Workshops Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars Discussion Group College Locator
More Teaching Strategies
More Teaching Strategies Image The Life and Times of a Workshop Junky:
Why It Pays to Attend More than Once
This Month's Teaching Strategy comes to us from one of our very own NASA Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) community members, Manuel Mon, at Florida Gulf... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image Building a Community of Practice:
We Are not Alone!
if you've read the "About Us" page, then you may already know that the NASA Center for Astronomy Education is dedicated to connecting practicing astronomy instructors... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image The Muddiest Point:
Are Our Students on the Same Page as We Are?
In our workshops instructors often express concerns about not knowing the extent to which their students left class understanding the main point, or the Big... More >>
  Additional Teaching Strategies >>
Seeing the Universe through NASA's Eyes
Image of the day NASA's Image of the Day Gallery
Operation IceBridge Turns Five
In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice around Antarctica had reached its greatest extent since the late 1970s. To better understand such dynamic and dramatic differences in the region's land and sea ice, researchers are travelling south to Antarctica this month for the sixth campaign of NASA’s Operation IceBridge. The airborne campaign, which also flies each year over Greenland, makes annual surveys of the ice with instrumented research aircraft. Instruments range from lasers that map the elevation of the ice surface, radars that "see" below it, and downward looking cameras to provide a natural-color perspective. The Digital Mapping System (DMS) camera acquired the above photo during the mission’s first science flight on October 16, 2009. At the time of the image, the DC-8 aircraft was flying at an altitude of 515 meters (1,700 feet) over heavily compacted first-year sea ice along the edge of the Amundsen Sea. Since that first flight, much has been gleaned from IceBridge data. For example, images from an IceBridge flight in October 2011 revealed a massive crack running about 29 kilometers (18 miles) across the floating tongue of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier. The crack ultimately led to a 725-square-kilometer (280-square-mile) iceberg. In 2012, IceBridge data was a key part of a new map of Antarctica called Bedmap2. By combining surface elevation, ice thickness, and bedrock topography, Bedmap2 gives a clearer picture of Antarctica from the ice surface down to the land surface. Discoveries have been made in Greenland, too, including the identification of a 740-kilometer-long (460-mile-long) mega canyon below the ice sheet. Repeated measurements of land and sea ice from aircraft extend the record of observations once made by NASA’s Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite, or ICESat, which stopped functioning in 2009. In addition to extending the ICESat record, IceBridge also sets the stage for ICESat-2, which is scheduled for launch in 2017. > NASA's Earth Observatory: Operation IceBridge Turns Five Image Credit: IceBridge DMS L0 Raw Imagery courtesy of the Digital Mapping System (DMS) team/NASA DAAC at the National Snow and Ice Data Center Caption: Kathryn Hansen... Read More >>

CAE is housed in the Astronomy Dept. at the Univ. of Arizona's Steward Observatory. CAE is funded through the generous contributions of the NASA JPL Exoplanet Exploration Public Engagement Program. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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