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CAE Executive Director Elected American Astronomical Society's Education Officer!
Mix One-Part Astronomy Education Research with One-Part General Education Astronomy Course and You Get a Very Potent Science Literacy Transformation Cocktail

If you want to watch his talk on the AAS website, click here.

If you want to download his talk, More >>

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Workshops Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars Discussion Group College Locator
More Teaching Strategies
More Teaching Strategies Image CAE Methods & Materials:
A "Newbie" Instructor's Perspective
This Month's Teaching Strategy comes to us from Joe Kabbes (Harper Community College). We met Joe at our CAE Teaching Excellence Workshop in St. Louis last summer.... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image Guest Moderation:
The Tradition Continues
It's hard to believe our Astrolrner@CAE Guest Moderation Program is entering its third year… Over the past year, Paul Robinson has been doing such a fine job,... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image The Muddiest Point:
Are Our Students on the Same Page as We Are?
In our workshops instructors often express concerns about not knowing the extent to which their students left class understanding the main point, or the Big... More >>
  Additional Teaching Strategies >>
Seeing the Universe through NASA's Eyes
Image of the day NASA's Image of the Day Gallery
Chandra Celebrates the International Year of Light
The year of 2015 has been declared the International Year of Light (IYL) by the United Nations. Organizations, institutions, and individuals involved in the science and applications of light will be joining together for this yearlong celebration to help spread the word about the wonders of light. NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory explores the universe in X-rays, a high-energy form of light.  By studying X-ray data and comparing them with observations in other types of light, scientists can develop a better understanding of objects likes stars and galaxies that generate temperatures of millions of degrees and produce X-rays. To recognize the start of IYL, the Chandra X-ray Center is releasing a set of images that combine data from telescopes tuned to different wavelengths of light. From a distant galaxy to the relatively nearby debris field of an exploded star, these images demonstrate the myriad ways that information about the universe is communicated to us through light. In this image, an expanding shell of debris called SNR 0519-69.0 is left behind after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. Multimillion degree gas is seen in X-rays from Chandra, in blue. The outer edge of the explosion (red) and stars in the field of view are seen in visible light from the Hubble Space Telescope. > More: Chandra Celebrates the International Year of Light Image Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO... Read More >>

CAE is housed in the Astronomy Dept. at the Univ. of Arizona's Steward Observatory. CAE is funded through the generous contributions of the NASA JPL Exoplanet Exploration Public Engagement Program. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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