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CAE Executive Director Elected American Astronomical Society's Education Officer!
Mix One-Part Astronomy Education Research with One-Part General Education Astronomy Course and You Get a Very Potent Science Literacy Transformation Cocktail

If you want to watch his talk on the AAS website, click here.

If you want to download his talk, More >>

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Workshops Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars Discussion Group College Locator
More Teaching Strategies
More Teaching Strategies Image Colin’s Wallace: “Why I Do What I Do”:
A Tale of Motivation
I have always been passionate about science. I grew up watching science documentaries from the BBC, PBS, and the Discovery Channel. My favorite toys were always... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image Astronomy Concept Inventories: Diagnosing Our Own Instruction
Revisiting our CAE Teaching Excellence Workshops
Assessment drives student learning, and it should drive our instruction (Brissenden et al, 2002).... More >>
More Teaching Strategies Image Classroom Assessment Techniques:
A Brief Overview
In our CAE Teaching Excellence Workshops, we discuss quite a few classroom assessment techniques that could be used to improve learning in an introductory... More >>
  Additional Teaching Strategies >>
Seeing the Universe through NASA's Eyes
Image of the day NASA's Image of the Day Gallery
Magnetospheric Multiscale Observatories Processed for Launch
NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observatories are processed for launch in a clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Florida. MMS is an unprecedented NASA mission to study the mystery of how magnetic fields around Earth connect and disconnect, explosively releasing energy via a process known as magnetic reconnection. MMS consists of four identical spacecraft that work together to provide the first three-dimensional view of this fundamental process, which occurs throughout the universe. The mission observes reconnection directly in Earth's protective magnetic space environment, the magnetosphere. By studying reconnection in this local, natural laboratory, MMS helps us understand reconnection elsewhere as well, such as in the atmosphere of the sun and other stars, in the vicinity of black holes and neutron stars, and at the boundary between our solar system's heliosphere and interstellar space. MMS is a NASA mission led by the Goddard Space Flight Center. The instrument payload science team consists of researchers from a number of institutions and is led by the Southwest Research Institute. Launch of the four identical observatories aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station is managed by Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Services Program. Liftoff is currently targeted for 10:44 p.m. EDT on March 12. Image Credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky... Read More >>

CAE is housed in the Astronomy Dept. at the Univ. of Arizona's Steward Observatory. CAE is funded through the generous contributions of the NASA JPL Exoplanet Exploration Public Engagement Program. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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